Carnation motif in mosaics

Mosaics as a traditional art technique represents the fundamental principle of the universe – unity in diversity. All creatures consist of cells; cells from molecules, molecules from atoms, and the atom is a basic unit of matter. So the principle of mosaics lies in the very basis of the construction of the universe.

My love of mosaics as a media comes from my passion for Byzantine art. Byzantine art combines classical and rational features of Greco-Roman art with the splendour and refined beauty of Persian art. The rich mosaic decoration of Byzantine churches inspired me to make mosaic pieces based on the geometry of the circle with the motif of Ottoman carnations. The motif of the Ottoman carnation along with the tulip became a recognizable feature of Turkish art and the symbol of the Ottoman ruling dynasty from 16th century AD.

I believe that the media you use has to represent the idea perfectly. If any other media gives a better look or better expression of an idea you should use this media. For this reason in my work I tried to show all the beauty of mosaics as a material. I use at least two colours together to make the colour I need so that the surface does not look flat. I also play with contrast using different sizes and shapes of tesserae and grey grout to make the picture more vivid.

The motif of carnation came to me from the beautiful Turkish velvet fabrics of 16th century. I also made a sketch and tried some other motifs but I liked the carnation most. The geometry of mosaics is traditional scallop-like shape. Scallop design and symbolism deserve a post too so I will write it later. I liked the idea of scallop-like geometry because it allows to make each mosaic artwork as a modul. You can tessellate these moduls the way you like and you can also cover an infinite surface with it.  Moduls are also easy to transport.

Before making a mosaic piece I made the motif out of paper. It was fun! And I like the result, it looks like an artwork. Then I counted a quantity of mosaic pieces I will need. Then I cut mosaic pieces the way I need, glued them on craft paper upside down with PVA.  Cut out plywood (with the help of guys:-)) . Covered plywood and mosaics (really carefully!) with an adhesive, glued mosaics and left overnight under preasure. Removed the paper, grouted the piece and cut out plywood with scallop shapes (guys again ;-)).

P.S. If you want to use materials from this post, acknowledge use, please. Thanks!

Turkish velvet cloth, 16 century. Moscow Kremlin museum

Turkish velvet cloth, 16 century. Moscow Kremlin museum

Sketches

Sketches

Sketches

Sketches

Tesselation

Tesselation

Counting mosaic pieces

Counting mosaic pieces

Paper mosaics

Paper mosaics

Paper mosaics

Paper mosaics

Paper mosaics

Paper mosaics

Glass mosaics I used

Glass mosaics I used

Mosaic pieces glued to craft paper face down

Mosaic pieces glued to craft paper face down

Mosaic pieces glued to craft paper face down

Mosaic pieces glued to craft paper face down

Mosaic pieces glued to craft paper face down

Mosaic pieces glued to craft paper face down

Mosaic pieces glued to craft paper face down

Mosaic pieces glued to craft paper face down

Mosaic pieces glued to craft paper face down

Mosaic pieces glued to craft paper face down

Mosaics - work in progress

Mosaics – work in progress

Mosaics - work in progress

Mosaics – work in progress

Mosaic module

Mosaic module

Mosaic module

Mosaic module

Mosaic wall panel. Marina Alin

Mosaic wall panel. Marina Alin

Mosaic wall panel. Marina Alin

Mosaic wall panel. Marina Alin

Mosaic wall panel. Marina Alin

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